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Celebrities

Olivia Culpo says she was ‘ugly duckling,’ was put on diet at age 10

Fox News Flash top entertainment headlines for October 24

Fox News Flash top entertainment and celebrity headlines are here. Check out what’s clicking today in entertainment.

Prior to her days as a Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover star, Olivia Culpo suffered from body image issues.

The model, 28, relentlessly compared herself to her older sister Aurora and felt that she was an “ugly duckling” when she was younger.

Culpo also struggled with her weight as a child. Her dad put her on a diet at age 10.

“Honestly growing up I felt really ugly which is a terrible thing to say," the former Miss Universe said in a joint interview with her sister Aurora on Monday.

SI SWIMSUIT MODELS OLIVIA CULPO, JASMINE SANDERS AND KATE BOCK SHARE 2020 COVER

Olivia Culpo reveals she struggled with her body image when she was a child.
(Getty)

She told hosts of the “Emergency Contact” podcast that she was “really different looking” as a kid.

“My older sister looked like the Barbie doll. I was overweight. I had to look myself in the mirror and say, ‘Okay, you’re different,’ because I was," the model said.

Culpo and Aurora then recalled the time the now-model was put on a diet.

"Our dad is amazing but our dad is like, Type A and has run over a dozen marathons," the Sports Illustrated star began.

OLIVIA CULPO'S BOYFRIEND, CHRISTIAN MCCAFFREY, REACTS TO STAR'S SPORTS ILLUSTRATED SWIMSUIT COVER

Olivia Culpo’s sister says she became confident after she was put on a diet at age 10.
(Getty)

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She continued: "When I was 10 years old, yeah, I was put on those diets and I kind of realized, when you put in the work you get the results. It kind of all started from there."

Aurora said: "She knew that she was overweight, so I think that she developed a skill for situating herself in situations where she would get the most attention. And then she got hot and she had that skill. That’s how you get on Sports Illustrated."

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Lifestyle

Prince Charles was supporter of Scottish nationalism as teen

Clarence House denies Prince Charles was once a ‘vociferous supporter’ of Scottish nationalism who would chant ‘down with Whitehall’ as a student, after royal expert makes claims in a new book

  • Biographer Ingrid Seward says her late husband Ross Benson recounted tales of the teenage Duke of Cornwall campaigning for Scottish nationalism as a teen
  • Her new book details how a young Charles shouted ‘down with Whitehall’ while campaigning for the SNP in a mock election  

A new book claims Prince Charles was a ‘vociferous supporter’ of Scottish nationalism who would chant ‘freedom for the Scots’ as a student. 

Royal author Ingrid Seward, the editor-in-chief of Majesty magazine, says her late husband, journalist Ross Benson, who was a classmate of Charles at the school, revealed how the young heir to the throne passionately took the side of Scottish nationalists in a mock debate.  

However, Clarence House has denied that the Prince, who, as heir to the throne, is forbidden from interfering in the world of party politics was involved in anything more than a fictional debate.  

The surprising support for the Nationalists is detailed in Seward’s latest book, which tells how the Duke of Rothesay, Charles’ Scottish title, campaigned for the SNP in the faux election while a pupil at Gordonstoun School, Moray. 

Scroll down for video 

Prince Charles was a ‘vociferous supporter’ of Scottish nationalism who would chant ‘freedom for the Scots’ as a student, a royal expert has claimed. Pictured, The Prince of Wales outside Trinity College Cambridge in 1970 

In her new biography of the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip Revealed: A Man of His Century, she wrote: ‘Normally Charles had middle-of-the-road views and was never extreme about anything.

‘He prepared his speeches diligently but there was none of the quick flashes of inspired thought or sudden witty comments for which his father is famous.

‘But one of the rare occasions when Charles blossomed occurred during the mock elections at the school. Charles became a vociferous supporter of the Nationalists.

‘Wearing his Stewart kilt, he marched up and down the grounds during the “campaign”, shouting “Scotland for ever”, “freedom for the Scots” and “down with the rule from Whitehall”.  

Together with his other political supporters, he held aloft a banner saying, “Vote for the Scottish Nationalists”.’

Ingrid added: ‘Charles went on to have a warm relationship with Alex Salmond and they often shared a dram together.

Charles, pictured at The Mey Highland Games in 2019, campaigned for Scottish nationalism, even shouting ‘down with rule from Whitehall’ at a school event

‘Mr Salmond, who also got on well with the Queen because of a shared love of horse racing, took a shine to Charles because he felt that anybody who loved Scotland was OK by him.

‘And through what Charles was as doing at Dumfries House, he saw that he really did love Scotland.

‘But Charles has never had the he same relationship with Nicola Sturgeon. It is polite and civil but more professional. Maybe if she knew Charles once campaigned for independence the relationship would be warmer – and he’d be more embraced by his “fellow Nationalists”.

Royal author Ingrid Seward was told about the incident by her late husband Daily Mail journalist Ross Benson, who was a classmate of Charles at the school. Pictured, Charles with the Chancellor of Cambridge University on his first day at the Trinity College 

‘Given the current climate for independence, it is very amusing and a little embarrassing.’

Ingrid went on: ‘My husband Ross and Charles were members of the same debating society, the ‘Sophists club’, which met at the home of the deputy English master Eric Anderson (later headmaster of Fettes and then Eton!). They were driven to house by Charles’s detective Michael Varney.

‘When Charles spoke in a debate all traces of shyness left him and he was one of the best debaters although Ross thought his views were a bit illogical but always clearly put. 

‘The subject of the monarchy was strictly taboo. But Charles prepared his speeches with notes and spoke convincingly.

‘He made lots of speeches supporting his party, the SNP, and a Tory supporter reminded him he was Prince of Wales not Scotland! “Freedom for Wales too” he said in the next election.

‘He loved Scotland loved wearing his kilt and on last day of school, the Queen came to see him and he wore his Hunting Stewart kilt in her honour.

Prince Charles, the Duke of Rothesay as he’s known in Scotland, and Camilla Parker Bowles are pictured leaving Canisbay Church near the Castle of Mey in Caithness in 2005 

‘He also loved Scottish poetry and Robbie Burns was one of his favourites and had a book of Scottish ballads he would carry around with him and learnt them by heart.”

Charles was a pupil at Gordonstoun from 1962 and it is believed his campaigning for the SNP took place at the school’s mock elections ahead of the real General Election in 1964, won by Labour’s Harold Wilson. The SNP’s leader at the time was journalist Arthur Donaldson.

It was during his term that the party began to grow and make its presence felt in Scottish politics.

An inspirational speaker, Donaldson enthused supporters while touring branches and constituencies.

The party won the 1967 Hamilton by-election, and polled more votes than any other party in the 1968 Scottish local authority elections.

During the 2014 independence referendum campaign, the Queen said she hoped ‘people will think very carefully about the future’.

The comment was made to a wellwisher outside Crathie Kirk near her Balmoral Estate in Aberdeenshire.

During the 2014 independence referendum campaign, the Queen said she hoped ‘people will think very carefully about the future’ while speaking to a wellwisher outside Crathie Kirk near her Balmoral Estate. Pictured, Her Majesty at the Braemar Royal Highland Gathering in 2014 

It followed reports that the Queen was growing increasingly concerned about the vote.

Royal officials insisted her remark did not breach her ‘constitutional impartiality, adding that ‘the monarch is above politics’.

Although Charles has reportedly described Gordonstoun as ‘Colditz in kilts’, he has also praised the school, stating it taught him ‘a great deal about myself and my own abilities and disabilities.

‘It taught me to accept challenges and to take the initiative’.

He became Guardian, or Head Boy, and left in 1967 with six GCE O-levels and two A-levels.

Charles’s SNP days are detailed in Seward’s new book about his father, Prince Philip Revealed, from Simon and Schuster, price £20.

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World News

Ghislaine Maxwell was given massages by Jeffrey Epstein's sex slave, court papers reveal

GHISLAINE Maxwell was given massages by a Jeffrey Epstein sex slave, explosive court papers reveal.

Maxwell, 58, refused to say if she and student Johanna Sjoberg were lovers, or if the sessions led to sex.



Details emerged in a defamation case brought against Maxwell in 2015 by Prince Andrew’s accuser, and Epstein slave, Virginia Roberts Giuffre.

Sjoberg and Andrew’s names were blanked out of the papers, released last week, as they were not involved in that case.

Sjoburg, now 40 and living in Maine, US, has accused Andrew of fondling her breast with a Spitting Image puppet of himself in 1999.

In the files Maxwell, currently awaiting US sex trafficking charges, is asked about Sjoberg: “How many massages did you receive from (name redacted)?



Maxwell: “I don’t recall but a fair amount.”

Virginia’s lawyer: “Did the massages involve sex?”

Maxwell’s lawyer: “I instruct you not to answer.”

Maxwell said Sjoberg had been willing to answer phones at billionaire Epstein’s six homes.

She denied recruiting young girls for predator Epstein.

Andrew, 60, has denied any wrongdoing.

Yesterday he wore a Covid mask as he drove in Windsor.

The evidence in the defamation case has never been tested before a judge.



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Beauty and Fashion

Doctors said my 6-year-old was FAKING her symptoms – she's now battling rare blood cancer

A YOUNG girl is battling a rare blood cancer after doctors told her mum she was faking her symptoms.

Little Elizabeth Osborne had been screaming in agony with hip pain and her devoted mum Emma rushed her to A&E.


On several occasions the little girl would experience excruciating pain – and her mum knew something wasn't right.

Each time the family visited the hospital the X-rays and blood tests would come back clear and Elizabeth would be sent home and her symptoms dismissed.

In order to make her feel better after the ordeal, Emma, who lives in Beechdale, Nottingham with her family, would give her little girl a treat.

Emma claimed that one doctor told her that Elizabeth was faking her condition because of this.

Emma knew her daughter wouldn’t be faking the symptoms and when a lump appeared in Elizabeth's cheek, she again took her daughter to hospital – where she was diagnosed with a rare type of Hodgkin's Lymphoma blood cancer.

After she first presented with the symptoms in March, seven months later — Elizabeth has now started a course of chemotherapy.

A doctor in A&E told me that it was down to parenting, that she was manipulating us because we would reward her after a visit to the hospital.

Online content creator Emma is now urging other mums to push for a second opinion if something doesn’t feel right.

The mum-of-one said it's been a terrible journey.

She said: "I hope that no other parent has to go through this.

“To think that your child is sitting with cancer in her body for seven months with no treatment is just horrific.

“I want to spread awareness to trust your instincts as a parent because you know your child the best.”

Emma said that she was angry that she fought hard for seven month with “nobody taking me seriously”.

“You just need to keep fighting”, she added.

What is lymphoblastic lymphoma?

Lymphoblastic lymphoma or LL is rare type of fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Macmillan Cancer Support states that it develops when the body makes abnormal lymphocytes.

The cancer can develop from both B-cell and T-cell lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are white blood cells that fight infection.

The abnormal lymphocytes (lymphoma cells) usually build up in lymph nodes but can also affect other parts of the body.

It is similar to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and is treated in the same way.

The condition is most common in kids and teenagers.

It was in March this year that little Elizabeth woke up screaming in pain.

Emma gave her some childrens’ paracetamol and a massage to ease the pain – but it only got worse.

Worried about her daughter, Emma called 111 and the operator advised her to go to A&E.

Doctors at Queen’s Medical Centre A&E in Nottingham took an X-ray and blood tests and everything came back clear.

They thought Elizabeth could have a transient hip, which is common in children and happens post-illness.

Emma suffers from arthritis and was concerned that Elizabeth was developing the condition.

Six weeks after the first visit to A&E, Elizabeth woke up screaming again – this time with a pain in her left leg.

The family once again rushed to A&E.

She said: “They looked over at her and said it could be growing pains so they sent us home again.

“This similar pattern went on for weeks because they said if it doesn’t get better then we should come back.

“Eventually a doctor in A&E told me that it was down to parenting, that she was manipulating us because we would reward her after a visit to the hospital.

“I was getting really frustrated because deep down I knew something wasn’t right with my child, that was deeper than what wasn’t showing up on X-rays or bloods.”

After several trips to A&E, a blood test found a vitamin D deficiency, but after an eight week course of medication, Elizabeth’s pain persisted.

In June a lump developed in Elizabeth’s cheek.

Experts thought it was a dental problem so referred the youngster to a Maxillofacial department.

Elizabeth was soon referred for an MRI scan which found a bone abnormality in her leg, 5cm below her knee and it was confirmed she had tumours in her face, throughout her skull and jawline.

Little Elizabeth then had a biopsy of the lump which confirmed that she had a rare B-Cell Non Hodgkin's Lymphoblastic Lymphoma after a near seven month battle for answers.

On October 6, Elizabeth was finally given an accurate diagnosis and has started a two-and-a-half year course of chemotherapy.

Emma said: “She was diagnosed earlier this month and she went straight to the hospital to start chemo.

“It struck my husband pretty hard but I was somewhat relieved now that I had answers to my instinct that I knew something was wrong with my child.

"We're really grateful to the doctors who helped get things rolling immediately as the results came in.

“Now we can work towards getting her better.”

The family are now raising money so that their little girl can continue her hobbies of dancing, video games and Brownies while receiving treatment.

The family have set a target of £5,000 and have so far managed to raise nearly £2,800.

Emma added: “She loves to game and she has a little computer at home which isn’t great but it lets her play games and hang out with her friends.

“While she’s going through her treatment, we thought it might be nice to go through it with the laptop so she can keep up with her friends and dance classes.

“We also want to be able to give her clubs a device to help them transmit the classes for her to her to join in.

“Her journey is a long one so we want to get her to feel as though she’s connected to the world outside the hospital for her mental health.

“We want it to feel like her life hasn’t stopped just because she’s in bed on chemotherapy.”

A spokesperson from Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, said: “We are sorry if Elizabeth or her mum felt her concerns were not listened to.

"Sadly childhood cancer can be very difficult to diagnose, especially with a very rare form such as this, and medical staff often need to carry out numerous tests to rule out other conditions before arriving at a diagnosis.

"We wish Elizabeth a swift recovery and strongly urge people to ensure they contact a doctor if they think there is something wrong with their child, themselves or a loved one."

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World News

Security guard was acting in self-defense during shooting of Denver protester: lawyer

Denver shooting suspect ID’d

Matthew Robert Dolloff, 30, was reportedly working as a contracted security guard for 9News at the time of the shooting.

A lawyer representing a television station security guard who shot and killed a demonstrator during opposing right- and left-leaning rallies this month told a judge Wednesday that there was “obvious evidence of self-defense."

Public defender Valerie Cole also asked a judge during a brief court hearing to consider lowering Matthew Dolloff's $500,000 bond so he could have a chance of being released from jail. Dolloff was charged with second-degree murder Monday.

Judge Shelley Gilman said she would leave a decision on bond to the judge who would be handling the case going forward.

FAMILY OF COLORADO MAN KILLED IN PRO-POLICE RALLY SEEKS ANSWER, LAWYER SAYS

Matthew Dolloff faces a murder charge in the death of Lee Keltner during a Denver rally last weekend. The lawyer for Keltner’s widow said the family wants answers regarding his employment as a contracted security guard for a local news station covering the rally. Courtesy Denver Police/ Twitter

Dolloff appeared by video from jail, where he has been held since shooting 49-year-old Lee Keltner on Oct. 10 while being paid by KUSA-TV to protect its staffers who were covering a “Patriot Muster” demonstration and a "BLM-Antifa Soup Drive” counterprotest.

In court, he wore green scrubs and a surgical mask, answering “Yes, your honor” to questions from the judge about the legal process and his rights.

Video from bystanders, including the TV producer Dolloff was working with at the time, and photos from The Denver Post show Keltner — who attended the “Patriot Muster" rally, according to his family's attorney — at first arguing with a Black man wearing a Black Guns Matter T-shirt before getting into an altercation with Dolloff. Cellphone video from the unnamed TV producer suggests Keltner was upset that the original argument was being recorded.

HUMAN SIDE, PASSION OF PRO-COP VETERAN WHO WAS GUNNED DOWN AT DENVER PROTEST SEEN IN VIDEO

The video shows Keltner, holding a spray can, walking out of view. A man’s voice — it’s unclear if it’s Keltner — is heard saying the area was no place for cameras.

“Get the cameras out of here or I’m going to f— you up,” the unidentified man says. Keltner and Dolloff are then shown scuffling before the video stops.

Photos from the Post show Dolloff pointing his gun at Keltner as he fires what police said was pepper spray at Dolloff before Keltner falls to the ground.

When the TV producer resumes filming after the shooting, he tells arriving police that he is with the press and that the man who was shot “was going to get me.” He also says the security guard shot Keltner because Keltner used mace.

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Lifestyle

Woman, 21, says she was 'never fully happy' until converting to Islam

Liverpool woman, 21, who converted to Islam to marry her husband says she was ‘never fully happy’ until she discovered her new faith – and insists wearing the hijab is a ‘choice’ that gives ‘so much confidence’

  • Bethany Ismail, 21, from Liverpool, converted to Islam in December last year 
  • Had started researching the religion before meeting her Muslim husband Ismail
  • In 2019 declared her faith by taking Shahadah and says she’s happier than ever  
  • Says her friends ‘didn’t bat an eyelid’ after she shared decision to change faith 

A British woman who has converted to Islam says she was ‘never truly happy’ until she discovered her new faith. 

Bethany Ismail, 21, from Liverpool converted to Islam in December 2019, after undertaking her own research into the religion and meeting her now husband Ismail Mohammed through mutual friends. 

The retail worker told FEMAIL how her faith has helped her find ‘peace and value  herself’ and that although her family took a while to adjust to her new life, they’re now ‘closer than ever’ – with her mum Alison even wearing a hijab on her wedding day. 

She said that while there’s been ‘a lot of hate’ on social media, much of the reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and that her friends ‘didn’t bat an eyelid’ after telling them her plans to covert. 

In December last year, Bethany Ismail, 21, pictured with her husband Ismail Mohammed, committed to converting to Islam, declaring the Shahadah at her local mosque

The retail worker, pictured with her mum Alison on her wedding day, told how the faith has helped her find ‘peace and value herself’

‘My life was okay. I was never fully happy,’ said Beth. ‘I had an amazing life don’t get me wrong – but I always knew there was something missing and something that I needed in my life. Islam made me find peace and value myself. ‘ 

Beth was raised in a Catholic family, undergoing her first Holy Communion as a child, but admitted she was never fully dedicated to the religion. 

‘I wasn’t brought up religious really’, she told. ‘I was brought up as a Catholic, but not strict. I had my communion and stuff, but that was mainly to get into schools in our area.’  

Beth says she had ‘always been around Muslims’, but became more interested in the religion after speaking to friends, and after hearing so many ‘stereotypes’ about Islam, she wanted to do some research into the faith. 

Beth, pictured before converting to Islam, says she had ‘always been around Muslims’, but became more interested in the religion after speaking to friends

Bethany Ismail, 21, from Liverpool converted to Islam in December 2019, after undertaking her own research into the religion and meeting her now husband through mutual friends

She that although her family took a while to adjust to her new life, they can see now she’s still the ‘same Beth, just in a scarf’ 

‘In the last few years as my friend introduced me to a couple of her friends who were Muslim, I always wondered about the religion as there are so many stereotypes about Muslims. I wanted to find out for myself. ‘ 

‘Our first phone call was meant to just be five minutes ended up being three hours long because we got along so well. And the rest is history.’ 

She went on: ‘I was lucky he was Muslim so he could teach me a lot too, as soon as I was researching it it just made sense and all the facts I found were just amazing, I couldn’t believe it. 

‘Islam is an amazing religion, people are mainly just uneducated and this is why there is such a bad light on it.’ 

Beth, picutred with her husband who she met through mutual friends, said she felt lucky to meet a Muslim man who could teach her so much about the religion 

As she researched the religion, Beth met her now husband Ismail Mohammed through mutual friends, insisting they ‘clicked instantly’. The pair are pictured on their wedding day 

In December last year, Beth committed to converting to Islam, declaring the Shahadah at her local mosque. 

‘It’s not a long process but if anyone is going to do it I would advise researching first’, said Beth. ‘And always wait until you’re ready, don’t let anyone pressure you.’ 

For Beth, the biggest change has been wearing a hijab daily, revealing the veil worn by some Muslim women has ultimately made her ‘much more confident in herself’.  

‘You don’t have to wear one, said Beth. ‘It’s your choice, and always wait until your ready. 

‘I had seen lots of people on social media and I used to try it on and think I didn’t suit it, but when it was Ramadan I started to wear it and I am so much more confident in myself wearing it, and I care a lot less about what others think of me. ‘ 


For Beth, the biggest change has been wearing a hijab daily, revealing the veil worn by some Muslim women has ultimately made her ‘much more confident in herself’

Beth insisted her friends ‘didn’t bat an eyelid’ at the decision, and that she’s been overwhelmed with the positive reaction she’s had from others around her

After sharing the news with her family, Beth, who has two sisters, admitted that her mother Alison initially had reservations, and was ‘concerned’ about the ‘stereotypes’ of living as a Muslim. 

‘My family weren’t too happy at the start,’ said Beth, ‘Which is understandable as there are a lot of stereotypes for Muslims, so they were mainly just concerned for my happiness.

‘But once time passed and they could see I was the same Beth and just wearing a scarf, they adjusted fine and now we are as close as we were before and they don’t treat me any differently, they were just worried as anyone would be.’ 

While it took her family a while to adjust, she insisted her friends ‘didn’t bat an eyelid’ at the decision, and that she’s been overwhelmed with the positive reaction she’s had from others around her.  

Speaking of her local Islamic community, she said: ‘I have a amazing group of revert friends and I attend classes to learn more about my religion and the teachers are amazing!’ 

While there has been some hateful comments on social media, Beth says the support she’s received has been ‘amazing’

‘My friends reacted amazingly, none of them even batted an eye lid and also making new friends is just the same! I have had so much support I am so grateful.’

Beth shares her journey on TikTok, amassing 7,569 Followers and 222,000 likes on the social media platform. 

While there has been some hateful comments on social media, Beth says the support she’s received has been ‘amazing’, and that her local Muslim community have been behind her every step of the way.  

‘The reaction on social media has been amazing, she said, ‘I couldn’t believe it when my video went viral! I am still in shock now. 

Beth shares her journey on TikTok , amassing a huge 7569 Followers and 222K likes on the social media platform

‘But there has also been a lot of hate as I did expect, but I just don’t even read it. I get more love than hate and I am so grateful for it.’ 

Speaking of her local Islamic community, she said: ‘I have a amazing group of revert friends and I attend classes to learn more about my religion and the teachers are amazing. 

‘In Liverpool there is a huge Muslim community and for reverts there is a lot of support I am really lucky.’ 

Beth added: ‘My life has been amazing I now value myself and others a lot more, I see the world and people in a whole different light and I am calmer and a better person.’ 

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Lifestyle

'I was drowning in grief – wild swimming saved me'

In January 2019, Sarah Norquoy’s world was shattered by the death of a close friend and her mother’s dementia diagnosis, both within the space of two weeks.

In search of solace from her all-encompassing grief, she turned to wild swimming and found that the freedom, exhilaration and mental challenge was enough to get her through the darkest days.

‘Both losing Fiona and hearing of discovering mum’s illness were devastating and happened less than two weeks apart,’ Sarah tells Metro.co.uk.

‘Fiona had a terminal illness and her passing was expected, but it was still heartbreaking that she was gone. She was my first friend when I moved to Orkney and we had been through a lot together.

‘Mum’s dementia diagnosis was also expected following a year of knowing something was wrong, but it was utterly devastating and I ugly cried for hours. My mum was disappearing before me and I dreaded what the future held.

‘The hardest part of losing Fiona was just the knowledge she was gone forever and I could never again share a joke with her or a piece of news I knew she would be interested in. 

‘With mum, it was the loss of hope. I knew she would only go one way and it was a daily, living grief of seeing such a strong capable woman struggle with everyday tasks like making scrambled eggs or find a jar of coffee.

‘People say you lose them twice, once when they are alive, and again when they leave this world.’

For Sarah, who recently turned 50, swimming was a revelation. Immersing herself in the cold and the salt of the ocean had a deeply cleansing effect on Sarah and was a huge factor in helping her feel like herself again.

She wanted to share her journey of discovery, to let other people know how incredible the power of wild swimming can be in times of deep emotional pain. So, this summer, Sarah published a book as an independent author called Salt On My Skin to tell the story of a year of sea swimming in Orkney in all temperatures and weathers.

Sarah wanted to show that turning 50 and not having a ‘perfect’ body shouldn’t be a barrier to what she wanted to achieve.

‘I’ve tried many ways of keeping active over the years and found swimming suited me best,’ explains Sarah.

‘Too much of me moves when I run! And, following a hip injury that lasted months, I found swimming puts no pressure on my joints.

‘Swimming in the pool is incredibly mindful as I plough up and down the lane thinking only of my breathing, whereas sea swimming brings a different joy. Still very much in the moment as you focus on the cold, but with the added bonus of being surrounded by nature, good company and mental challenge.

‘Wild swimming is now as natural to me as walking the dog. 

‘For a long time, I saw keeping fit as a bit of a chore. I would start new activities and not stick with them, but swimming has stayed with me and I never get bored of it.

‘The beauty of wild swimming in a place like Orkney is there’s always different places and locations to try and you never get bored.’

Sea swimming became Sarah’s therapy as she learnt to live with the grief of losing her friend and dealing with her mum’s decline. 

‘I’m going to quote straight from my book here, it explains it for me so easily,’ says Sarah.

‘I dreamed about Mum and she was young and OK. I awoke grief-stricken, there were tears on my pillow. I was thankful for a day off so went down to the sea close to home. It’s possible to cry and swim at the same time, I’ve discovered.

‘Salty tears merge with the sea and both heal me.

‘As I opened my eyes, it was an unusually spring-like February morning. The sun was streaming in the window and I had a rare day off from work. I decided I needed the ocean to wash away my sadness, so I jumped in the car to the local beach.

‘It was my first lone swim, and I didn’t plan to stay long. I headed across the stones and splashed into the waves. Nothing sharpens your focus like an icy blast from a wave, and as you catch your breath and put your shoulders under, you are totally in the moment and think of nothing else but where you are.

‘There’s no place for distraction, no space for the rest of life. It’s just you, the waves, the cold, the salt, and the moment. That moment might only be ten or 15 minutes, but it’s yours, it’s exhilarating, and the effects can last for hours.

‘The tears I thought I might drown in were washed away by a different kind of saltwater.

‘I returned home reset. I had this. I could do hard things.’

Sarah really committed to her new hobby. She got up at 4.30 am to swim at sunrise, she had a moonlit swim on her 50th birthday, lit up by the last full moon of the decade.

Without a doubt, the most exhilarating was when I had the opportunity to swim in ice,’ says Sarah. ‘This was top of my swimming bucket list and I was high all day.’ 

Sarah says that swimming has had an enormously positive impact on her relationship with her body and body image.

‘I’ve never had a good relationship with my body and have often been mortified with my size and shape,’ she explains.

‘Over the last 18 months, since wild swimming, I’ve been through quite a transition. I broke out of a box I didn’t know I was trapped in and found pulling starfish poses in the sea completely liberating.

‘I discovered I was so much more than the body I was contained in, and my body could do amazing things like swim in six-degree waters and go snorkelling, all before work!

She says wild swimming is completely addictive, and unlike other vices, the side effects are overwhelmingly positive.

‘It’s a great chance to get outside, challenge yourself, boost your mental wellbeing, cope with grief, empty nest, stress; the list is endless,’ says Sarah.

‘To me, being strong is not just about physical strength; its the ability to challenge yourself to do hard things whatever that means to you. To feel empowered by overcoming challenges whatever they look like to you. It’s about learning to love yourself and being able to get back up again, every time.’  

Proud Of What We’re Made Of

This article is part of our weekly series, Proud Of What We’re Made Of, celebrating inspirational women with powerful stories.

Each Wednesday we’ll share the story of a woman who’s overcome challenges to achieve something amazing. You can read every Proud Of What We’re Made Of article here.

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Categories
Lifestyle

'I was drowning in grief – wild swimming saved me'

In January 2019, Sarah Norquoy’s world was shattered by the death of a close friend and her mother’s dementia diagnosis, both within the space of two weeks.

In search of solace from her all-encompassing grief, she turned to wild swimming and found that the freedom, exhilaration and mental challenge was enough to get her through the darkest days.

‘Both losing Fiona and hearing of discovering mum’s illness were devastating and happened less than two weeks apart,’ Sarah tells Metro.co.uk.

‘Fiona had a terminal illness and her passing was expected, but it was still heartbreaking that she was gone. She was my first friend when I moved to Orkney and we had been through a lot together.

‘Mum’s dementia diagnosis was also expected following a year of knowing something was wrong, but it was utterly devastating and I ugly cried for hours. My mum was disappearing before me and I dreaded what the future held.

‘The hardest part of losing Fiona was just the knowledge she was gone forever and I could never again share a joke with her or a piece of news I knew she would be interested in. 

‘With mum, it was the loss of hope. I knew she would only go one way and it was a daily, living grief of seeing such a strong capable woman struggle with everyday tasks like making scrambled eggs or find a jar of coffee.

‘People say you lose them twice, once when they are alive, and again when they leave this world.’

For Sarah, who recently turned 50, swimming was a revelation. Immersing herself in the cold and the salt of the ocean had a deeply cleansing effect on Sarah and was a huge factor in helping her feel like herself again.

She wanted to share her journey of discovery, to let other people know how incredible the power of wild swimming can be in times of deep emotional pain. So, this summer, Sarah published a book as an independent author called Salt On My Skin to tell the story of a year of sea swimming in Orkney in all temperatures and weathers.

Sarah wanted to show that turning 50 and not having a ‘perfect’ body shouldn’t be a barrier to what she wanted to achieve.

‘I’ve tried many ways of keeping active over the years and found swimming suited me best,’ explains Sarah.

‘Too much of me moves when I run! And, following a hip injury that lasted months, I found swimming puts no pressure on my joints.

‘Swimming in the pool is incredibly mindful as I plough up and down the lane thinking only of my breathing, whereas sea swimming brings a different joy. Still very much in the moment as you focus on the cold, but with the added bonus of being surrounded by nature, good company and mental challenge.

‘Wild swimming is now as natural to me as walking the dog. 

‘For a long time, I saw keeping fit as a bit of a chore. I would start new activities and not stick with them, but swimming has stayed with me and I never get bored of it.

‘The beauty of wild swimming in a place like Orkney is there’s always different places and locations to try and you never get bored.’

Sea swimming became Sarah’s therapy as she learnt to live with the grief of losing her friend and dealing with her mum’s decline. 

‘I’m going to quote straight from my book here, it explains it for me so easily,’ says Sarah.

‘I dreamed about Mum and she was young and OK. I awoke grief-stricken, there were tears on my pillow. I was thankful for a day off so went down to the sea close to home. It’s possible to cry and swim at the same time, I’ve discovered.

‘Salty tears merge with the sea and both heal me.

‘As I opened my eyes, it was an unusually spring-like February morning. The sun was streaming in the window and I had a rare day off from work. I decided I needed the ocean to wash away my sadness, so I jumped in the car to the local beach.

‘It was my first lone swim, and I didn’t plan to stay long. I headed across the stones and splashed into the waves. Nothing sharpens your focus like an icy blast from a wave, and as you catch your breath and put your shoulders under, you are totally in the moment and think of nothing else but where you are.

‘There’s no place for distraction, no space for the rest of life. It’s just you, the waves, the cold, the salt, and the moment. That moment might only be ten or 15 minutes, but it’s yours, it’s exhilarating, and the effects can last for hours.

‘The tears I thought I might drown in were washed away by a different kind of saltwater.

‘I returned home reset. I had this. I could do hard things.’

Sarah really committed to her new hobby. She got up at 4.30 am to swim at sunrise, she had a moonlit swim on her 50th birthday, lit up by the last full moon of the decade.

Without a doubt, the most exhilarating was when I had the opportunity to swim in ice,’ says Sarah. ‘This was top of my swimming bucket list and I was high all day.’ 

Sarah says that swimming has had an enormously positive impact on her relationship with her body and body image.

‘I’ve never had a good relationship with my body and have often been mortified with my size and shape,’ she explains.

‘Over the last 18 months, since wild swimming, I’ve been through quite a transition. I broke out of a box I didn’t know I was trapped in and found pulling starfish poses in the sea completely liberating.

‘I discovered I was so much more than the body I was contained in, and my body could do amazing things like swim in six-degree waters and go snorkelling, all before work!

She says wild swimming is completely addictive, and unlike other vices, the side effects are overwhelmingly positive.

‘It’s a great chance to get outside, challenge yourself, boost your mental wellbeing, cope with grief, empty nest, stress; the list is endless,’ says Sarah.

‘To me, being strong is not just about physical strength; its the ability to challenge yourself to do hard things whatever that means to you. To feel empowered by overcoming challenges whatever they look like to you. It’s about learning to love yourself and being able to get back up again, every time.’  

Proud Of What We’re Made Of

This article is part of our weekly series, Proud Of What We’re Made Of, celebrating inspirational women with powerful stories.

Each Wednesday we’ll share the story of a woman who’s overcome challenges to achieve something amazing. You can read every Proud Of What We’re Made Of article here.

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World News

Girl, 15, who was shot in lungs forced to go back to school despite Covid risk after parents threatened with fine

A TEENAGE girl who was shot in her lungs has been forced to return to school despite being a Covid risk because her parents were threatened with fines.

Thusha Kamaleswaran, 15, was shot in the chest when she was just five after being caught in the crossfire in a shooting at her uncle’s shop.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates


She was left paralysed after a bullet shattered her spine as it passed through her body and her injuries mean she is vulnerable to respiratory infections.

During the coronavirus pandemic the schoolgirl has been shielding and has been studying at home.

Thusha though was forced to return to classes at Seven Kings School in Ilford, Essex, after the school threatened to fine her parents – dad Sasi, 45, and mum Shamila, 43 – even though her doctor had warned against it.

What are the rules on fines for parents if kids miss school?

Families who ignore the government's rules on their kid's education will be hit with a penalty unless they have a "good reason".

It is against the law to withhold your child from school, except for a small number of exceptions.

Under current laws, a local council can give each parent a fine of £60, which rises to £120 each if the fine is not paid within 21 days.

If the fine still remains unpaid after 28 days you may be prosecuted for your child’s absence from school.

Children who are particularly vulnerable to coronavirus and those who have compromised immune systems are exempt from mandatory school attendance.

Schools minister Nick Gibb also reiterated that fines are something that "headteachers are very reluctant to use, they only use them as a last resort.”

Her GP, Dr PJ Suresh, wrote a letter to the school saying her lung function wasn’t optimal, adding: “Every effort should be made to allow Thusha to study and do her school work remotely.”

Thusha’s brother Thusan, 21, says the doctor even phoned the school but the family were still warned they could be fined or taken to court.

Thusan told the Sunday Mirror: “Thusha returned to school on Monday but feels unsafe and anxious. It seems really unfair after all she’s been through.”

Seven Kings’ head of pastoral care, Dean Taylor, claimed the letter from the GP “did not provide the necessary information”.

He added: “When a pupil is absent we are obliged to comply with school attendance regulations.

“We have done this while seeking to support and advise the family further.”

Heartbreaking CCTV footage captured tiny Thusha happily doing dance moves in the aisle of her uncle’s shop, Stockwell Food and Wine, in South London, just before the 2011 horror.

Moments later three gang ­members targeting a drug-dealing rival who had gone into the shop opened fire into the store, where her father Sasi was working.

The gang members who shot her were jailed for life the following year.


 

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Categories
TV and Movies

Who was Rhonda Fleming, was she married and what were her most famous films?

RHONDA Fleming was a Hollywood star in the 1940s and 50s, most famous for her roles in Alfred Hitchcock's Spellbound in 1945 and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court in 1948.

She was known as the “queen of technicolor” due to her frequent roles in the rise of colored television and movies at that time. 

Who was Rhonda Fleming?

Marilyn Louis, aka Rhonda Fleming, 97, hailed from Los Angeles. 

She worked as a film actress while attending Beverly Hills High School and was discovered by an agent named Henry Willson.

He coined her stage name as Rhonda Fleming and signed her to a seven-year contract to begin starring in films.

Fleming went on to work for producer David O. Selznick under her agent’s watch. 

After eight years she decided to quit working with Selznick and wanted to branch out elsewhere.

She joined Paramount Pictures and starred in a few MGM films in the late 1950’s.

How did Rhonda Fleming die?

The Hollywood star passed away on October 14 at Saint John's Health Center in Santa Monica

The cause of death has not been revealed.

Was she married and did she have any children?

Fleming was married six times throughout her life and only had one son with Thomas Wade Lane. 

She gave birth to Kent Lane, 79 in 1941.

She was married to: Thomas Wade Lane, divorced two years later, Dr. Lewis V. Morrill, divorced two years later, Lang Jeffries, divorced two years later, Hall Bartlett, divorced seven years later, Ted Mann, widowed 24 years later, and Darol Wayne Carlson, widowed 14 years later. 

Her last husband passed away in 2017.

What films was she in?

Fleming’s career blew up after her role in Hitchcock’s movie and went on to star in her first lead role, Adventure Island.

The star was then casted for The Great Lover, The Last Outpost alongside Ronald Reagan, The Golden Hawk, Cleopatra, Pony Express, Inferno, and many more. 

In May of 1957 she also launched a Tropicana nightclub in Las Vegas where she performed for many years but eventually stopped as she was raising her son Kent. 

In addition to her movie roles, Fleming frequently appeared on television with guest-starring roles on The Red Skelton Show, The Best of Broadway, The Investigators, Shower of Stars, and The Dick Powell Show.

Her last two films were The Nude Bomb in 1980 and Waiting for the Wind in 1990. 

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