Categories
World News

Pub who claimed chilli eating contest exempt from lockdown facing ban

Pub landlord who claimed chilli eating contest was exempt from lockdown rules because its an ‘elite sport’ is hit with prohibition notice

  • Craig Harker, 33, landlord of The George Pub and Grill served prohibition notice
  • The pub in Stockton-on-Tees, Durham hosted a chilli eating contest on Nov 7
  • He insists no rules were broken because competitive eating is an ‘elite sport’  
  • The council made a U-turn on earlier decision that no action would be taken

A pub landlord who claimed a chilli eating contest was exempt from lockdown rules because its an ‘elite sport’ has been hit with a prohibition notice.

Craig Harker, 33, landlord of The George Pub and Grill in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, has been served with a prohibition notice following the British Eating League event in the earlier this month.

The socially distanced eating tournament was attended by a TV crew and five ‘athletes’ taking on the hottest chillies in the world.

The event was held in conjunction with the British Eating League but a complaint was lodged to Stockton Council after concerns it was in breach of lockdown rules.  

Pub landlord Craig Harker (pictured), 33, has been hit with a prohibition notice over a chilli eating contest that was held at The George Pub and Grill in Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham, on November 7

However Mr Harker, who runs the pub, said he adhered to the guidelines as he classes competitive eating as an elite sport.

He hit back at those that complained and insists no rules were broken. 

Government guidelines for lockdown state that restaurants and pubs must close but venues are permitted to be open for a small number of exempt activities –  including for elite sportsmen and women to train and compete. 

Mr Harker didn’t sell any food or drink during the competition so therefore didn’t break any lockdown rules stating that pubs and restaurants aren’t allowed to sell products.  

Earlier this month, Stockton Council made inquiries into the event and concluded that no further action would be taken against the pub.

But this week, the council made U-turn on their earlier decision and the pub was served with a prohibition notice in relation to the November 7 event. 


The event was in conjunction with the British Eating League but a complaint was lodged to Stockton Council after concerns it was in breach of lockdown rules. Pictured: Two of the five ‘athletes’ who took on the hottest chillies in the world

It claims there were ‘reasonable grounds for believing’ Mr Harker is ‘contravening a requirement in the regulations and that it is necessary and proportionate to issue a prohibition notice to prevent continued contravention of that requirement.’

It means the pub can no longer serve food and drink on the premises.

Pub landlord Mr Harker has hit back at the council’s decision and said he will be appealing the notice. 

Mr Harker said: ‘Of course, I’ll be appealing the decision and fighting the case that competitive eating is a sport and an elite level as well.

‘It’s lockdown 2 and people are looking online for entertainment, the British Eating League provides that under a safe environment whilst sticking to Government guidelines.

‘I won’t turn and hide and be told how I can and can’t run my business.

‘We are a successful restaurant and take-away looking to expand across Teesside and then the rest of the UK, if anything the council is pushing us away from the area and our customers.

Pub landlord Mr Harker insists no rules were broken because competitive eating is an ‘elite sport’ and said he will be appealing the notice. Pictured: Chillies eaten in the competition

‘They should be praising us and begging us to stay in the town rather than fight us at every opportunity.’ 

Councillor Bob Cook, Leader of Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council, told TeessideLive: ‘Mr Harker held a competitive eating event in his venue which we believe to be a breach of national restrictions.

‘We have therefore served him with a Prohibition Notice.’

Prohibition notices can be served under new legislation introduced in March in response to the rising number of coronavirus cases.

Local authorities and police have the power to close premises that are failing to observe the lockdown.

Under the new legislation, if a person fails to comply with a prohibition notice, they commit an offence. 

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
Lifestyle

Is eating chocolate making you break out?

When you were younger, your parents probably kept a running list of all the foods that are “bad” for you. These concerns may sound familiar: sugary sweets and desserts were a big no-no depending on the portion or time of day, while fruits and vegetables were the healthy alternatives that were always added onto your plate. When it comes to diet and skin health, you might wonder whether they were right. One day, your skin is glowing only to wake up in the morning with a loud pimple that mysteriously popped up onto your face. Breakouts are almost always attributed to the amount of sweets you eat. In fact, one of the most popular beliefs is that eating chocolate aggravates your skin and leads to breakouts. (via Byrdie).

But is this actually true or just a myth we’ve been told so we add more veggies to our diets? The List asked health and skin experts to weigh in on the age old debate of whether chocolate causes acne.

Does chocolate cause breakouts? The results are in

It turns out that it’s all about moderation and the type of chocolate you are eating. Dr. Lisa Young, a nutritionist, author of Finally Full, Finally Slim: 30 Days to Permanent Weight Loss One Portion at a Time, and adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University, explained the benefits of eating dark chocolate on your skin. “Dark chocolate contains cocoa polyphenols, which are anti-oxidants which is good for skin health,” she said. But Young added that “refined sugars, like those found in chocolate, may trigger inflammation. So if one is prone to acne, they may want to practice moderation.” Although the processed sugar found in chocolate can cause acne, there are other ingredients such as cocoa that actually benefit your skin.

Cybil Solyn, an esthetician and skin fitness expert, echoes Young’s sentiment on dark chocolate and adds that the ingredients found in milk chocolate are the main issue. “Chocolate itself doesn’t give most people acne, it’s the combination of fat, sugar, and dairy that’s in milk chocolate that’s giving it such a bad rap,” Solyn tells The List. “To enjoy the anti-aging and mood-boosting benefits of cocoa, eat dark chocolate (65% or higher) with little to no sugar—this way your skin can stay zit free and glowing.” The debate is settled. While the ingredients found in certain chocolates can lead to breakouts, it can also improve your mood and make your skin look healthier.

It looks like you can add dark chocolate back into your shopping cart.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
Lifestyle

Would YOU stop eating meat to support a vegan or vegetarian partner?

Would YOU stop eating meat to support a vegan partner? Research shows 20% of people who ditch burgers and steaks do so to keep their relationship happy

  • Vegan food brand polled 2,000 people about why they’d decided to ditch meat
  • 18 per cent of those polled said they changed their diet to support their partners
  • One third admitted they would have kept tucking into meat if they weren’t in a relationship with a non-meat eater
  • 34 per cent of adults who’d turned vegan or veggie admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time 

Brits are much more likely to stop eating meat if their other half is vegan or vegetarian, according to new research. 

One in five former meat-eaters said they’d made the decision to ditch burgers and steaks to support their partner.

A study, carried out by vegan food brand The Fry Family Co, asked 2,000 veggies or vegans what inspired them to stop consuming meat or animal-based products, and nearly 20 per cent admitted their decision was led by their love lives.

One third of the people polled said that they wouldn’t have made the switch if they had not received encouragement from their partners in the first place.

Scroll down for video 

A study carried out by vegan brand The Fry Family Co, found that 18 per cent ditched meat or animal-based products to keep their other half happy or to support their lifestyle (stock image)

Encouragement didn’t just come from partners though, as the data collected also showed that 16 per cent made changes after their children requested the change and 19 per cent said they were convinced by friends to change their diet.

Tammy Fry, representing the brand, said: ‘Our research shows that when it comes to trying out a plant-based diet, encouragement from partners, family and friends can be really helpful.

‘Whether it’s sharing experiences, advice or handy meal tips, talking to loved ones about the benefits of swapping to a meat-free diet can go a long way in encouraging others to reduce their meat or dairy consumption.

‘When it comes to taking steps towards a meat-free diet, it doesn’t have to be ‘all or nothing’ – you can simply start by making easy swaps once or twice-a-week.

One third of the people polled said that they wouldn’t have made the switch if they had not received encouragement from their partners in the first place (stock image)

‘It’s never been easier to introduce meat-free options into your diet without compromising the taste, or quality, of your meal.’

The study also found that eight out of ten people who made the change found it easier than they’d thought it would be and 53 per cent admitted to feeling healthier and more energetic.

Despite this, seven per cent of those polled found ditching meat difficult and said they were faced with a lack of choice when eating out and cooking. 

34 per cent of adults admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time and 28 per cent of those polled said it was hard to convince the entire family and find a takeaway.

And 23 per cent of those people who gave up their plant-based diet admitted they would consider trying again (stock image)

Fry Family Food Co conducted a second poll of 1,000 adults and found that 46 per cent had tried a vegetarian or plant-based diet at some point and of that proportion, 49 per cent had done so for a partner.

However, the average person only kept the lifestyle going for 19 weeks and for one in 20, the main reason for reverting to meat was their relationship ending.

23 per cent of those people who gave up the plant-based diet admitted they would consider trying again.

In response to their polls, The Fry Family Food Co challenged four meat-lovers to try their plant-based range to see if they could tell the difference.

Pangs: 34 per cent of adults admitted to missing chicken, bacon and sausages at dinner time (stock image)

Alice De-Warrenne, from London, who initially believed nothing could taste as good as, or replace the flavour of meat, said: ‘I’m still a meat lover, but I’m definitely open to trying new things.

‘This did not taste how I expected it to, especially the Meat-Free Chicken Nuggets. I would happily have those every day.’ 

Tammy Fry added: ‘Our research has revealed that those who follow a plant-based diet feel healthier, have more energy, and most importantly, found the change in the diet far easier to adapt to than they could have imagined.

‘We’re keen to encourage as many people as possible to try going meat-free, even if it’s just making an easy swap once or twice a week.’

To encourage people to make an easy swap themselves, The Fry Family Food Co is giving away a years’ worth of Meat-Free Chicken-Style Nuggets, if they pledge to make an easy swap to plant-based at least once a week.

Source: Read Full Article